Articles Posted in Health Care Law

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Mountain Regional Services, Inc. (MRSI), which provides services to individuals who receive medical benefits administered by the Wyoming Department of Health, filed a petition seeking judicial review of a “Provider Bulletin” issued by the Department concerning these benefits. The district court dismissed the petition for lack of ripeness and because MRSI failed to exhaust its administrative remedies before seeking judicial review. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding (1) the district court correctly concluded that the matter was not ripe for judicial review, and (2) therefore, it was unnecessary to consider the issue of exhaustion of administrative remedies.View "Mountain Reg’l Servs., Inc. v. State ex rel., Dep’t of Health" on Justia Law

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In 2013, Bryan Skoric, the Park County Attorney, reconsidered the extent of his office’s participation in civil commitment proceedings and decided not to continue to participate in emergency detention hearings under Wyo. Stat. Ann. 25-10-109 or to appear and prosecute the case in chief at involuntary hospitalization hearings under Wyo. Stat. Ann. 25-10-110. Appellants, the West Park Hospital District and Yellowstone Behavioral Health Center, filed a petition for writ of mandamus asking the district court to compel Skoric to proceed in the same way as he had in the past. The district court denied Appellants’ application for the writ. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding (1) the statutes in question do require a county attorney’s office to participate in civil commitment proceedings; but (2) the statutes are ambiguous, and therefore, extraordinary relief was not warranted when Appellants filed their petition. View "State ex rel. West Park Hosp. Dist. v. Skoric" on Justia Law

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Johanna Hicks died from an accidental overdose of her medications. Hicks’ estate filed suit against the doctor who treated Hicks for severe chronic pain for negligently causing Hicks’ death and filed suit against the doctor’s employer, claiming it should be held vicariously liable for the doctor’s negligence. A jury found that the doctor was not negligent in his treatment of Johanna and returned a defense verdict. On appeal, the estate argued that the district court erred by permitting the doctor and his codefendant to introduce the testimony of two expert witnesses on the doctor’s adherence to the appropriate standard of care for practitioners of pain medicine. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the estate failed to preserve for appellate review the issue regarding the admissibility of the testimony of the two standard of care experts.View "Hicks v. Zondag" on Justia Law